July 3, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

In between the Apostle Paul’s first and second letter to the Corinthians we read two Psalms and two chapters of Ezra.

July 3: Psalm 51, Psalm 52, Ezra 3, Ezra 4 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 51, of David, written after Nathan confronted David after his adultery with Bathsheba. This Psalm explains fully, how God would say, after David was pointed out to be both an adulterer and a murderer: “He was a man after God’s own heart”.

Psalm 52, Of David. The Psalm is a contemplation of David, contrasting the final end of evil men with the rewards of the righteous.

Ezra 3. Worship was restored in Jerusalem and the restoration of the Temple began to great rejoicing, but also weeping.

Ezra 4. There arouse resistance to building the Temple and the rebuilding of Jerusalem was successfully opposed (for a while).

July 2, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

In between the Apostle Paul’s first and second letter to the Corinthians we read two Psalms and the first two chapters of Ezra.

July 2: Psalm 49, Psalm 50, Ezra 1, Ezra 2 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 49, of the Sons of Korah. This psalm is more of a teaching Psalm and give instruction on how to live and hope of salvation “But God will redeem my soul from the power of the grave, For He shall receive me

Psalm 50, of Asaph. God says “for every animal of the forest is mine,
    and the cattle on a thousand hills.” andSacrifice thank offerings to God,
    fulfill your vows to the Most High,
     and call on me in the day of trouble;
    I will deliver you, and you will honor me.

Ezra 1 begins with the end of the Babylonian captivity and Cyrus decree to rebuild the Temple. The people prepared to return to Jerusalem.

Ezra 2 lists the captives who returned to Jerusalem.

June 30, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

In between the Apostle Paul’s first and second letter to the Corinthians we read three Psalms and two chapters in second Chronicles.

June 30: Psalm 46, Psalm 47, Psalm 48, 2 Chronicles 33, 2 Chronicles 34 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 46, of the Sons of Korah. “Let us sing the forty-sixth psalm in concert; and then let the devil do his worst.” (Martin Luther)

Psalm 47, of the Sons of Korah. “Sing praises to God, sing praises“.

Psalm 48, of the Sons of Korah. “Great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised.”

2 Chronicles 33. Manasseh king of Judah became a sorcerer, repented and was restored but eventually died and was replaced  by Amon , who reigned for two years, did evil, was killed and his son Josiah became king.

2 Chronicles 34. King Josiah tore down the altars to the idols, but not before he had their priests killed and burned on them. Then he took up offerings to restore the temple. Hilkiah the priest found the Book of the Law. Josiah then restored the temple and the temple worship and the people followed as long as Josiah lived.

June 29, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

In between the Apostle Paul’s first and second letter to the Corinthians we read one Psalm and two chapters in second Chronicles.

June 29: Psalm 45, 2 Chronicles 31, 2 Chronicles 32 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 45, of the Sons of Korah, a Wedding Song. C.S. Lewis saw this psalm pointing to Christmas: “The birth of Christ is the arrival of the great warrior and the great king. Also of the Lover, the Bridegroom, whose beauty surpasses that of man. But not only the Bridegroom as the lover, the desired; the Bridegroom also who makes fruitful, the Father of children still to be begotten and born.” (C.S. Lewis, cited in Willem VanGemeren)

2 Chronicles 31 tells of the Reforms of Hezekiah. “He did it with all his heart, and prospered.

2 Chronicles 32. Sennacherib boasted against the LORD but was  defeated and died. Hezekiah humbled himself,so the LORD sent an angel to deliver Judah. Hezekiah grew in wealth and honor, but he too finally died.

June 12, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

Today, the last day between Romans and 1 Corinthians we are reading two Psalms and two chapters in 1 Chronicles..

June 12: Psalm 43, Psalm 44, 1 Chronicles 15, 1 Chronicles 16 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 43. This Psalm can very well be a continuation of Psalm 42. Nevertheless, it is a Psalm of deep depression and yet full of praise and hope.

Psalm 44, of the sons of Korah. It is a Psalm recounting the great victories God gave the Israelites when they followed God, and the humiliating defeats they suffered when they did not. Yet the psalmists were trusting God and claimed they had not forgotten the Lord and ended with an urgent plea for help.

1 Chronicles 15. The Ark was brought to Jerusalem. When David’s wife Michal, daughter of Saul saw David dancing in the street at the joyous occasion, she despised him.

1 Chronicles 16, The Ark was placed in the Tabernacle, and David’s song of thanksgiving is recorded. After that the regular worship resumed.

June 11, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

Taking a pause between Romans and 1 Corinthians we read today three Psalms and two chapters in 1 Chronicles..

June 11: Psalm 40, Psalm 41, Psalm 42, 1 Chronicles 13, 1 Chronicles 14 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 40, of David. It speaks of the servant that comes to do God’s will. David attributed this to himself, but it is spiritually a messianic Psalm.

Psalm 41, of David. A prayer for help in sickness and protection from traitors and other enemies.

Psalm 42, a Maskil. Of the sons of Korah. A very old Psalm, it mentions Elohim many times, but Jehovah only once. It begins “As the deer pants for the water brooks, So pants my soul for You, O God.” Enjoy!

1 Chronicles 13.The Ark  was brought from Kirjath Jearim to the family of Obed-Edom the Gittite. “And the ark of God remained with the family of Obededom in his house three months. And the Lord blessed the house of Obededom, and all that he had.

1 Chronicles 14, David was firmly established at Jerusalem and he went to battle with his growing army and defeated the Philistines.

June 9, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

Taking a pause between Romans and 1 Corinthians we read today two Psalms and two chapters in 1 Chronicles..

June 9: Psalm 38, Psalm 39, 1 Chronicles 8, 1 Chronicles 9 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 38, of David, a Petition. This is a Psalm of deep despair and remorse. David acknowledged his sin and cried out to God. Yet, in failing health and abandonment by friends and family his hope in God remained steadfast.

Psalm 39, of David. At the  later part of his life David wrote this Psalm to give words of wisdom, knowing the end for him was near. It is sometimes quoted in part during funerals to give comfort when words are hard to find.

1 Chronicles 8 lists the genealogy of king Saul.

1 Chronicles 9 lists the people, the priests, the Levites and the Levite gatekeepers in Jerusalem that had returned after the captivity in Babylon. It continues with other Levite responsibilities and finally gives another part of the genealogy of king Saul.

June 8, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

Taking a five day pause between Romans and 1 Corinthians we are today reading one Psalm and two chapters in 1 Chronicles..

June 8: Psalm 37, 1 Chronicles 6, 1 Chronicles 7 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 37, of David. With two lines dedicated to each letter of the Hebrew alphabet, this psalm is one of the longer acrostics in the book of Psalms. David wrote it late in life (“ I have been young, and now am old;
Yet I have not seen the righteous forsaken,
Nor his descendants begging bread.“) It is full of promises and praise, and was intended for memorization.

1 Chronicles 6 lists the family tree of Levi, musicians in the house of the Lord, the family tree of Aaron and, since the Levites had no land allocation it lists their dwelling places.

1 Chronicles 7 lists the family tree of Issachar, the family tree of Benjamin, the family tree of Naphtali, the family tree of Manasseh West of Jordan, the family tree of Ephraim and the family tree of Asher.

May 22 read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

Tomorrow we begin reading Paul’s letter to the Romans, but for today we read two Psalms and one chapter in 1 Kings.

May 22: Psalm 35, Psalm 36, 1 Kings 18 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 35, of David. An urgent call for God to execute His righteous judgment on the enemies of God and vindicate David.

Psalm 36, of David, the Servant of the LORD. This Psalm also tells of wicked people, but then shows the mercies of God and ends up with David recognizing that without God’s protection he too is vulnerable as are we all.

1 Kings 18. This chapter alone makes the reading of 1 Kings up to now worthwhile. Elijah met Obadiah and sent a message to King Ahab. When they met, Elijah challenged Ahab to a competition: Four hundred fifty prophets of Baal and four hundred prophets of Asherah against Elijah alone on Mount Carmel to see whose God is victorious! You know the rest, enjoy reading!

May 21 read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

Today, still in between the Acts of the Apostles and Paul’s letter to the Romans we are reading two Psalms one chapter in 1 Kings.

May 21: Psalm 33, Psalm 34, 1 Kings 17 (click on the chapter to begin reading)

Psalm 33, is a Psalm about the sovereignty of God in creation and history. Here and in many other places of the Bible it encourages us to “sing a new song”.

Psalm 34, of David. This Psalm is an almost acrostic psalm (except for the letter waw). Like many acrostic Psalms, this is to be sung and memorized as it is full of praise and good advice. It contains one notable prophetic reference: “Many are the afflictions of the righteous, But the LORD delivers him out of them all.
He guards all his bones; Not one of them is broken.”

1 Kings 17. With Baal worship in full swing Elijah prayed fo a multi-year drought. He then went into the wilderness by a brook and was fed by ravens. But the brook dried up so he went to a widow in Zarephath. He asks her for water and some bread. That was the last of the flower she had, but she gave it to Elijah anyway. Later the widow’s son died and Elijah revived him. The jar of flour and the jug of oil never emptied as long as Elijah was in the house, miracle upon miracle!