August 21, read through the Bible in a year.

Today we read the first chapter of Colossians and three chapters of Isaiah.

August 21: Colossians 1, Isaiah 30, Isaiah 31, Isaiah 32, (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Colossians 1. Paul begins with his customary greeting, continues with a prayer  emphasizing faith in Christ and the preeminence of Christ. He tells the Colossians to be reconciled in Christ, “Christ in you, the hope of glory”  and to perform sacrificial service in Christ.

Isaiah 30 emphasizes “Don’t trust in Egypt!” But they are a rebellious people; in spite of that God will be gracious to Israel, but execute judgement on Assyria.

Isaiah 31 proclaims woe to the Egyptophiles. The LORD will pass over Israel, but nit Assyria.

Isaiah 32 ushers in the reign of reign of righteousness, warns against complacency, and says (in King James Bible) “ The vile person shall be no more called liberal” (NIV translates liberal as noble) so a few verses down it says (in NIV) “But the noble make noble plans, and by noble deeds they stand.” The promise is  that the Holy spirit is righteousness and “The fruit of that righteousness will be peace.”

August 20, read through the Bible in a year.

In between Philippians and Colossians we read three Psalms and two chapters of Isaiah.

August 20: Psalm 81, Psalm 82, Psalm 83, Isaiah 28, Isaiah 29 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Psalm 81, of Asaph. A Psalm for the Feast of Tabernacles.

Psalm 82, of Asaph. Jesus quotes this Psalm and confounds the people accusing him of blasphemy.

Psalm 83, of Asaph. An urgent prayer for God to help when war is threatening.

Isaiah 28. Woe to Ephraim and Jerusalem! “Thus saith the Lord God, Behold, I lay in Zion for a foundation a stone, a tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation: he that believeth shall not make haste.

Isaiah 29 begins with a woe to David’s City, the people have “the spirit of slumber,” but the deaf will hear, the blind see and the meek shall increas the joy in the LORD.

August 19, read through the Bible in a year.

In between Philippians and Colossians we read two Psalms and two chapters of Isaiah.

August 19: Psalm 79, Psalm 80, Isaiah 26, Isaiah 27 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Psalm 79, of Asaph. A cry for help, for the heathens are devastating Jerusalem, the Temple and the people. The Psalmist confesses their collective sins and pleads for restoration, always with praise and thankfulness.

Psalm 80, of Asaph. A prayer for restoration of Israel, mentioning the Shepherd of Israel, a heartfelt and urgent plea.

Isaiah 26 is a song of praise full of Messianic prophecy. The song is full of words with double meanings, one obvious and one prophetic.

Isaiah 27 promises the deliverance of Israel.

August 18, read through the Bible in a year.

In between Philippians and Colossians we read one chapter of Proverbs and three chapters of Isaiah.

August 18: Proverbs 12, Isaiah 23, Isaiah 24, Isaiah 25 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Proverbs 12 contains Proverbs of Solomon.

Isaiah 23 records a prophecy about Tyre.

Isaiah 24 describes the LORD’s devastation of the earth. (Climate change anyone?)

Isaiah 25. After the dire prophecies of Chapter 24 comes this song of praise.

 

August 17, read through the Bible in a year.

In between Philippians and Colossians we take a break and read two Psalms.

August 17:  Psalm 77: Psalm 78 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Psalm 77, of Asaph. No matter how dire the circumstances the believer can still sing God’s praises and recall  God’s wonders.

Psalm 78, a maskil of Asaph. “This is the longest of the historical psalms. Its lesson is that history must not repeat itself. The people must never again be unbelieving.” (James Montgomery Boice)

August 16, read through the Bible in a year.

Today we read the last chapter of Philippians and four chapters of Isaiah.

August 16: Philippians 4, Isaiah 19, Isaiah 20, Isaiah 21, Isaiah 22 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Philippians 4. Paul’s theme is joy “dearly beloved and longed for, my joy and crown, so stand fast in the Lord, my dearly beloved.” andRejoice in the Lord always: and again I say, Rejoice.” and this gemNot that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content.” and this one “I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me.” This letter of joy and encouragement ends with a greeting: “The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen.”

Isaiah 19 gives an oracle about Egypt and tells of the future blessing of Assyria, Egypt and Israel.

Isaiah 20 is very short and contains a prophecy against Egypt and Cush.

Isaiah 21. The prophecies continue, this time against Babylon, Edom and Arabia.

Isaiah 22 contains a prophecy about Jerusalem.

August 15, read through the Bible in a year.

Today we read the third chapter of Philippians and three chapters of Isaiah.

August 15: Philippians 3, Isaiah 16, Isaiah 17, Isaiah 18 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Philippians 3. Paul has reason to brag about his perfect Jewish credentials, but he does not, he will glory only in Christ, and his resurrection. Let us press on towards the goal, after all, our citizenship is in heaven.

Isaiah 16 speaks of the destruction of Moab.

Isaiah 17 tells of the oracle against Damascus (as a side note featuring Nancy Pelosi in Damascus)

Isaiah 18 features a prophecy against Cush (with a vignette from modern Sudan).