A Climate Realist’s (not so) short Answers to Hard Questions About Climate Change. Question 12 (of 16) Will anyone benefit from global warming?

NOV. 28, 2015 gave his answers to 16 questions in the N.Y. Times regarding Climate Change. This Climate realist added his answer.

 Answers to Question 1: How much is the planet heating up?

Answers to Question 2. How much trouble are we in?

Answers to Question 3. Is there anything I can do?

Answers to Question 4. What’s the optimistic scenario?

Answers to  Question 5. Will reducing meat in my diet help the climate?

Answers to Question 6. What’s the worst-case scenario?

Answers to Question 7. Will a tech breakthrough help us?

Answers to Question 8. How much will the seas rise?

Answers to Question 9. Are the predictions reliable?

Answers to Question 10. Why do people question climate change?

Answers to Question 11. Is crazy weather tied to climate change?

Justin Gillis answers to Question 12. Will anyone benefit from global warming?

In certain ways, yes.

Countries with huge, frozen hinterlands, including Canada and Russia, could see some economic benefits as global warming makes agriculture, mining and the like more possible in those places. It is perhaps no accident that the Russians have always been reluctant to make ambitious climate commitments, and President Vladimir V. Putin has publicly questioned the science of climate change.

However, both of those countries could suffer enormous damage to their natural resources; escalating fires in Russia are already killing millions of acres of forests per year. These countries may think differently, once they are swamped by millions of refugees from less fortunate lands.

My answers to Question 12. Will anyone benefit from global warming?

Most people benefit from global warming. Temperature in the tropics increase only marginally, the closer to the poles you go, the greater the benefits. Snowfall will increase, winter temperatures will moderate, leading to less temperature tension between regions, less hurricanes, less tornadoes, less severe rainstorms but more rain, less droughts, in short, good all around. There are some areas that will suffer, such as the hot deserts. But the desert fringes will benefit, check the agricultural aspect of the questions.

A new Bachelor of Science degree in Climate Change Science at Lyndon State College, to be launched this fall, will give students skills to confront the pervasive problems caused by global climate issues.

As the impacts of global warming grow and intensify, LSC is addressing a crucial need for trained professionals to find solutions to climate change challenges. One of few such degree programs in the country and the only one in Vermont, the innovative major is part of LSC’s nationally known Atmospheric Sciences department. Students will be prepared for a wide range of career opportunities in a rapidly evolving field.

The cutting-edge program will train students to apply their skills in a variety of areas affected by climate change, including renewable energy, public policy, climate risk management, and urban and natural resource planning. Students will do research with faculty on externally funded projects that will influence government and business initiatives.

The interdisciplinary curriculum includes general science courses and meteorology and climatology courses. Students will gain hands-on experience with data collection, learn technological skills for climate data analysis and environmental assessment, and develop communication skills to help bridge the gap between scientists and non-scientists.

“Climate change may be the greatest challenge humanity has ever faced. We are altering our atmosphere in a way that is changing our climate and impacting all life on our planet,” says Janel Hanrahan, assistant professor in the Atmospheric Sciences department. “These impacts are expected to escalate, and our atmosphere will likely be altered for thousands of years into the future.”

A new LSC website, the Climate Consensus, features faculty blogs, student content, articles, social media pages and a way for the public to give input. Visit http://www.theclimateconsensus.com/.

For more information about the Climate Change Science program, visit LyndonState.edu/ClimateChange.

Having said all that, it takes a lot of energy to clean up the environment.

Answers to Question 13. Is there any reason for hope?

Answers to Question 14. How does agriculture affect climate change?

Answers to Question 15. Will the seas rise evenly across the planet?

Answers to Question 16. Is it really all about carbon?

Published by

lenbilen

Engineer, graduated from Chalmers Technical University a long time ago with a degree in Technical Physics. Career in Aerospace, Analytical Chemistry, and chip manufacturing. Presently adjunct faculty at PSU, teaching one course in Computer Engineering, the Capstone Course.

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