September 5, read through the Holy Bible in a year.

Galatians 5: 16-25. “ Stand fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.” Paul spoke of christian liberty, love fulfills the law and is accomplished by walking in the spirit.

Isaiah 41 waxes eloquent about the helper of Israel. “How firm a foundation” is to stand with God. Compare that to the futility of idols!

Isaiah 42 records the Servant of the LORD as a light for the Gentiles. The sons of Kedar will sing a new song, which is not the doctrine of Islam, as some Muslims claim, but as so often was the case, Israel was still blind and deaf.

Psalm 77, of Asaph. No matter how dire the circumstances the believer can still sing God’s praises and recall God’s wonders.

January 20: Read through the Holy Bible in a year.

John 13 begins the last 24 hours before the crucifixion of Jesus. Jesus washed the disciples’ feet before the Passover meal, a task normally performed by the lowest servant. During the meal he announced his betrayal, and then he gave the disciples a new commandment “love one another”. He also predicted Simon Peter’s denial.

Genesis 38 tells  the story of Judah and Tamar. One of the rules of the Old Testament is that if a man dies without producing an heir it was the duty of his brother to try to produce an offspring to his widow. Onan shirked this responsibility, and that was the sin of Onan. Tamar was thus still barren, so she tricked Judah into committing adultery. You can read it for yourself. Judah finally confessed: She is more righteous than I.

Genesis 39 then picks up the story of Joseph and Potiphar’s wife. The story is a classic, and for doing the right thing, Joseph is falsely accused and thrown in jail.

Psalm 7 is a shiggaion, a dithyrambic ode of David. I would love to hear what the music to this Psalm sounded like.

August 17, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

In between the Apostle Paul’s letter to the Philippians and his equally encouraging letter to the Colossians we take a break and read two Psalms.

August 17:  Psalm 77: Psalm 78 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Psalm 77, of Asaph. No matter how dire the circumstances the believer can still sing God’s praises and recall  God’s wonders.

Psalm 78, a maskil of Asaph. “This is the longest of the historical psalms. Its lesson is that history must not repeat itself. The people must never again be unbelieving.” (James Montgomery Boice)

August 17, read through the Bible in a year.

In between Philippians and Colossians we take a break and read two Psalms.

August 17:  Psalm 77: Psalm 78 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Psalm 77, of Asaph. No matter how dire the circumstances the believer can still sing God’s praises and recall  God’s wonders.

Psalm 78, a maskil of Asaph. “This is the longest of the historical psalms. Its lesson is that history must not repeat itself. The people must never again be unbelieving.” (James Montgomery Boice)