John 18:28-40, Jesus taken to Pilate, to Herod, to Pilate, release Barabbas.

John 18:28-40, Jesus taken to Pilate, to Herod, to Pilate, release Barabbas.

 
 

Jesus had already eaten the Passover with the apostles. Most Jews had switched to the next day to eat the Passover since the evening sacrifice had been switched from just after sunset on the 14th of Nisan to after the ninth hour on the 14th of Nisan, or 21 hours later. (Remember, a Jewish day starts at sunset.)

Luke 23: When Pilate heard of Galilee, he asked whether the man were a Galilaean. And as soon as he knew that he belonged unto Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who himself also was at Jerusalem at that time. And when Herod saw Jesus, he was exceeding glad: for he was desirous to see him of a long season, because he had heard many things of him; and he hoped to have seen some miracle done by him. Then he questioned with him in many words; but he answered him nothing. 10 And the chief priests and scribes stood and vehemently accused him. 11 And Herod with his men of war set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate. 12 And the same day Pilate and Herod were made friends together: for before they were at enmity between themselves.

 

Published by

lenbilen

Retired engineer, graduated from Chalmers Technical University a long time ago with a degree in Technical Physics. Career in Aerospace, Analytical Chemistry, computer chip manufacturing and finally adjunct faculty at Pennsylvania State University, taught just one course in Computer Engineering, the Capstone Course.

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