Who is this unsung civil rights hero?

  In December 2010 a police lieutenant’s son, Justin Collison, sucker punched a black homeless man named Sherman Ware outside a bar [in Sanford, Fla.] Although Ware suffered a concussion and there was video evidence of Collison’s attack, no action was taken against Collison, who is white, for nearly a month. Reuters reporter Daniel Trotta talked about the incident in his April 3 2013 analysis of the early days of the Trayvon Martin phenomenon, but he failed to tell the full story.

  Upset at the lack of media attention the Ware case was getting, a young man and his wife, printed fliers demanding that the community hold accountable officers responsible for misconduct. They then passed fliers out to area churches. At a public meeting in January 2011, the young man took the floor and said, ‘I would just like to state that the law is written in black and white. It should not and cannot be enforced in the gray for those that are in the thin blue line.’ The meeting was recorded on video. As a result of the publicity, police chief Brian Tooley, whom he blasted for his ‘illegal cover-up and corruption,’ was forced to resign, and Collison was arrested. The couple headlined their fliers with a famous quote from Anglo-Irish statesman Edmund Burke: ‘The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

This young man was George Zimmerman.

Zimmerman worked with “the local NAACP and Natalie Jackson – who would become part of Team Trayvon – to seek justice for Ware, and they all betrayed him after the incident with Trayvon Martin, because it was in their best interest to pretend they didn’t know who he was.”

The story of Zimmerman’s crusade has largely gone unreported, through mainstream media indifference and the labeling of anyone who mentions it as “racist,” said Jack Cashill in his new book “If I had a son.”Ifihadason

“Robert Zimmerman tried to get out this story, but Natalie Jackson said that he was playing the ‘race card’ (calling Zimmerman a racist), and the mainstream media didn’t want to know this side of Zimmerman, because they had their narrative and they didn’t want any information to get out that contradicted it,” Cashill wrote.

“If the reader had any doubt that media bias was at the heart of the George Zimmerman trial, Jack Cashill’s powerful new book, ‘If I Had a Son,’ puts this misconception to rest. Armed with example after example of purposeful media falsifications, lies, and deceptions, Cashill explores how the black grievance industry (BGI) and the race-mongering mainstream media manufactured a narrative that Zimmerman was an over-vigilant cop wannabe who stalked Trayvon Martin to his untimely death. The real story is quite different: The teenage Martin had been suspended from school on multiple occasions, and had a recent preoccupation with guns—none of which was known to Zimmerman when their paths met.

Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2013/10/george-zimmerman-civil-rights-hero/#itfwbje3JCEkTo38.99

Published by

lenbilen

Engineer, graduated from Chalmers Technical University a long time ago with a degree in Technical Physics. Career in Aerospace, Analytical Chemistry, and chip manufacturing. Presently adjunct faculty at PSU, teaching one course in Computer Engineering, the Capstone Course.

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