October 12, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

Today we read the first chapter of the letter to the Hebrews and one chapter of Jeremiah.

October 12: Hebrews 1, Jeremiah 51 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Hebrews 1 starts out with one of the most fantastic openings in the whole Bible. The other twos are Genesis 1:1-4 and John 1:1. The rest of the chapter includes Old Testament passages to support the supremacy of Jesus Christ.

Jeremiah 51 tells of the time of the Lord’s vengeance, the Destruction of Babylon. The words of Jeremiah end with his command to Seraiah.

October 12, read through the Bible in a year.

Today we read the first chapter of the letter to the Hebrews and one chapter of Jeremiah.

October 12: Hebrews 1, Jeremiah 51 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Hebrews 1. One of the most fantastic openings in the whole Bible. The other ones are Genesis 1:1-4 and John 1:1. The rest of the chapter are Old Testament passages to support the supremacy of Jesus Christ.

Jeremiah 51 tells of the time of the Lord’s vengeance, the Destruction of Babylon. The words of Jeremiah end with his command to Seraiah.

 

Hebrews 1, the supremacy of Jesus Christ.

(This was my first teaching the adult Sunday School class some years ago, hence the original power point background.)

My guess is that Aquila and Priscilla taught Apollos, who wrote it down, and Paul added input, especially chapter 13.

Back to the beginning of the introduction:

This is all one sentence in Greek, and together with Genesis 1:1-4 and John 1:1-14 are some of the best opening paragraphs of all literature, and should be taught in all English classes at least once.

Psalm 2:7  I will proclaim the Lord’s decree: He said to me, “You are my son;
    today I have become your father.

Deuteronomy 32:43 (ESV) Rejoice with him, O heavens;
    bow down to him, all gods, (Septuagint and Dead Sea scrolls, this part missing from the Masoretic text) for he avenges the blood of his children]
    and takes vengeance on his adversaries.
He repays those who hate him
    and cleanses his people’s land.”

Could it be that the Masoretic text has omitted this part of the verse to lessen the divine aspect of Jesus? Anyhow, the author reminds the Hebrews that the Dead Sea scrolls  and the Septuagint contain this phrase.