September 24, read through the Holy Bible in a year in Power-point, with comments.

In between the Apostle Paul’s First and Second letter to Timothy we read three Psalms and one chapter of Jeremiah.

September 24: Psalm 108, Psalm 109, Psalm 110, Jeremiah 20 (click on the chapter to begin reading).

Psalm 108, a Psalm, a song of David. Here David repeated parts from Psalm 57 and Psalm 60 and used it to ask for God’s help in his further conquests as he subdued nations around him.

Psalm 109, of David. Leaving vengeance to God, David prayed for the full measure of God’s vengeance to be poured out on his wicked enemies. He is “poor and needy” and vengeance is God’s business.

Psalm 110, of David. Two quotes stand out from this Psalm: “The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool.“, and “The Lord hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.” Who was David talking about? Hint: The book of Hebrews gives the answer.

Jeremiah 20. The chief priest Pashhur heard Jeremiah prophesy bad outcomes, so he punished Jeremiah, which led to the word of God given to Pashhur. Jeremiah gave yet another complaint to God, this time even to the point of complaining he was born.

 

Published by

lenbilen

Retired engineer, graduated from Chalmers Technical University a long time ago with a degree in Technical Physics. Career in Aerospace, Analytical Chemistry, computer chip manufacturing and finally adjunct faculty at Pennsylvania State University, taught just one course in Computer Engineering, the Capstone Course.

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